We're All Guilty Of Unhealthy Behavior In Relationships — But We Can Do Better
At first glance, it looks like any other Valentine's Day pop-up shop. Piles of fuzzy teddy bears line pale pink shelves, red heart balloons bob toward the ceiling, and chocolate boxes wait to be taken home to your sweetheart.

But look a little closer and you'll see that none of these things are your typical V-Day gifts. Squeeze that teddy bear's tummy and it'll bark, "Where have you been?!" at you, and then immediately apologize. Rather than saying, "I love you," the writing scrawled across the balloons says, "You're just like my ex," or, "All you do is complain." And that chocolate box? It only has one piece of chocolate in it, with a note that says, "I love you. But maybe you should watch your weight."

Of course, this isn't a regular store — it's a Valentine's Day pop-up from the One Love Foundation, an organization dedicated to teaching young people the signs of domestic abuse. The store was set up in New York City last weekend to help people identify an unhealthy relationship and learn, as One Love's campaign puts it, to #LoveBetter.